Maintaining a Positive Digital Presence — September 27, 2015

Maintaining a Positive Digital Presence

After researching my digital footprint last week, I was excited to create a plan to maintain my digital presence.  You can find my plan on this Google Slides Presentation.  It is also linked to the image below.

Click on the Image to View my Slideshow
Click on the Image to View my Slideshow

 

 

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Digital Footprint — September 20, 2015

Digital Footprint

digitalworldYour digital footprint is the path you weave whenever you interact online. It is inevitable to avoid leaving a footprint, however,  in most cases you are in control of what information you share.  Becoming educated on what a digital footprint is will be very important.  This is something that I already teach to my students since we use blogs, Diigo, and other networking sites.  However, I feel that many adults should pay closer attention to their digital footprint.  The Internet Society provides some good insight into digital footprints and the ways we can leave them.  It is interesting to realize that you are contributing to your footprint more than you think.  It is not just when you post or comment, but also when you visit various sites, make purchases and more.  I have found that it is important to remember that digitally, your personal and professional lives can weave together.  Something that is posted on a “personal account” can still be found when someone is searching for your professional information.

In contrast, your digital footprint can be a positive thing!  It can help you advance professionally and help you network.  You can share resources you have created or your annotations on a resource.  This can be viewed as an example of your work and help connect you to others in your profession.

Keeping a professional mindset and thinking before your post/comment/share/favorite/etc. will help you maintain a positive digital footprint.

Danielle Leone is a fairly popular name, so searching for digital footprint proved difficult.  On the first page of results, the only link that leads to me is of the St. John Fisher College Softball Roster.  This site contains an image of me, my hometown, high school, and softball statistics.  As I went through the next couple of pages I found a YouTube video done by MHS TV News, on my first season as head softball coach.  I also found a link to my Pinterest Page.  The amount of “Danielle Leone’s” found online made it hard to find information that was specific to me.  It made me wonder that if someone was searching for me, could they stumble upon someone else and confuse their information, opinions, etc. as my own?

About 10 pages in I found a site titled Twicsy.com.  This site contains your twitter pictures.   My old Twitter account was private, yet all of my pictures can be seen on this site.

I decided to search more specifically for “Danielle Leone CT” which yielded more specific results.  Much of my digital footprint is made up of softball stories from college.  I also came across my name in Ellington Public School database, as well as, my Boise State Ed Tech blog.

Searching for my digital footprint was interesting!  It gave me a chance to see what someone might find when searching for me.  I was happy to see that all of the information online was positive and I had monitored my digital footprint fairly well!  One thing I did note, is that I have not made my professional presence known in the digital world.  This course has opened my eyes to the impact social media can have on sharing resources and participating in professional development.  I hope to use this course to improve my digital footprint by adding more professional information, resources, experiences, feedback and more.

Twitter for Professional Development — September 14, 2015

Twitter for Professional Development

Twitter_icon

Twitter is a great resource.  It can be accessed from many devices and anywhere with a connection to the internet.  This makes it a great tool for professional development.  It provides ease of access, continuous enrichment, instant feedback, and inspiring ideas.  In just the few weeks I have found myself back on Twitter, I have already found a wealth of resources to begin using in my classroom.

By following #sschat, I am able to learn about different ideas to use in the social studies classroom.   For example, the most recent chat centered on upcoming Constitution Day.  As an American history teacher, this was extremely relevant and helpful!  Professionals in the discussion shared ideas for investigating how current events relate to the Constitution, or exploring the Constitution from different points of views to learn more about political parties.

While scrolling through my #edtech column, I came across a great resource on getting students to innovate.  Mia MacMeekin made an infographic with 27 ways to inspire students to innovate.   I plan to use this to help my students understand what it means to innovate and challenge them to use these ideas throughout our next unit.

#gafe led me to a great resources on GAFE-friendly tools for evidence based writing in social studies.  The author discusses the Imagine Easy Scholar extension that helps students through their research process!  I also found out about a chat tomorrow on Creating Digital Awareness.  Looking forward to learning more about technology integration and tools!

My district has a partnership with Teachers College Reading and Writing Project.  We attend several PD’s each year and have a consultant visit our schools.  Using #tcrwp allows me to stay up to date with TC’s latest ideas, and also connect with other educators who use their protocols and ideas.  Scrolling through my TweetDeck led me to find some great ideas for mentor texts in the middle school writing workshop.

I have been working towards a flipped classroom and leading students to drive their learning by using technology.  I added the #elearning column to my TweetDeck.  I was happy to find some great ideas right away.  One article discussed the use of story telling when explaining new concepts.  This is something that I have gotten away from in the past couple of years, but am now inspired to begin adding this back to my classroom.  I am thinking that adding short animated stories as part of the flip videos my students can access will be a great addition.

In just a few short weeks, Twitter has transformed my classroom.  I have found great new resources and ideas that I have already began using.  While I have not participated in a chat yet, I am looking forward to participating and receiving instant feedback from professionals all over the world.  I think that Twitter is a great way to participate in professional development.  Whether it is through an organized chat, by discovering new resources, or by getting feedback on a resource you shared, Twitter allows for “just-in-time” pd that can transform the classroom!

EDTECH 543: Creative Expression — September 12, 2015

EDTECH 543: Creative Expression

This module helped me understand the importance and effectiveness of being a connected educator. Since graduating college, I have been leery of social networks, fearing that students may find me online, or job prospects may disagree with a post.  But this module’s resources showed me that my growth as an educator is dependent on my ability to stay connected and continuously learn.  I no longer need to wait for my districts next professional development day to learn new ideas and design new learning experiences for my students.

I used Piktochart for my Creative Expression.  My image includes four parts:  Personal Learning Networks, Communities of Practice, Connectivism, and the educator/user.  Each of these parts are separate pieces that come together to create new opportunities, new learning, and new resources.  The “puzzled educator” would represent someone who may be new to connected learning, or someone who is searching for answers or feedback.  It is up to them to become a connected educator.

For the Personal Learning Network puzzle piece, I used some social media icons to represent ways to form your PLN and as places to guide your new learning.  They surround a wireless symbol showing how they are all connected.  Daniel Mackley describes PLNs as “deliberately formed networks of people and resources capable of guiding our independent learning goals and professional development needs.”  Using resources, such as Twitter, Blogger, Google Plus, etc., educators and all professionals can form connections with people from all over.  Those connections can be used to gain ideas, feedback, and spark conversations.

Another aspect of connected learning, are Communities of Practice.  These allow for more specific focuses and interests.  My image is of people connected surrounding a light bulb.  This represents COPs which are groups of people who share similar interests or passions who come together to share ideas.  They join together and build relationships to learn from each other.  The COPs share experiences, ideas, tools, and feedback to furher their own knowledge and expand their practice.  These communities can be formed in person, but can also be formed through your social media sources.  For example, my district has an “Ellington Teachers” group on Twitter.  We are able to share ideas, share our students’ experiences, and build off of others ideas, even though we are not all in the same schools.

The final puzzle piece, displays Connectivism.  I used the image of a world with an Ethernet cable connection in it exemplifying how connections can be made throughout the world.  Connectivism is based on the idea that knowledge and resources are constantly changing.  Staying connected is essential in the digital age of learning.  George Siemens explains learning as being connected to information sources and “continually acquiring new information.”  Being able to connect with people and resources around the world are essential to concept of connectivism

Putting the pieces together, allows educators or any professional to participate in continuous learning.  The ability to stay “up to date” and gain instant feedback can be essential in professional development.  We no longer need to wait for our next professional development day, we can learn on our couch, while traveling, at any time or in any place!


Putting the Pieces Together

References

Mackley, D. (2014, May 13). What is a Personal Learning Network/Environment? Retrieved from https://blog.yorksj.ac.uk/moodle/2014/05/13/what-is-a-personal-learning-network/

Siemens, G. (2004, December 12). Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. Retrieved from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/connectivism.htm

Wenger-Trayner, E., & Wenger-Trayner, B. (2015, April 15).Introduction to communities of practice. Retrieved from http://wenger-trayner.com/introduction-to-communities-of-practice/