swingstatemap1-fw

 

The users of this image will be 8th grade American history students studying the 2016 campaign.  This unit will likely be the first time they will learn about swing states and their influence in the election.  This image will allow them to learn which states are the most important to watch for on election day.  Students should know the state abbreviations and be able to decipher which states are the swing states.  In addition, the students should know to use a key when referring to a map.  

To help focus students and create an image that is not too distracting, I used the same font and similar font colors throughout this image.  This use of repetition should help the students understand the purpose of the text and not become confused (Lohr, 203).  

I also considered the proximity of the text in my image. Within the map, I have little control of where I can place my text.  However, the title and the key were tricky when considering placement on the image.  I chose to make place both of them at the top of the image to show their important in understanding the image.  But I placed them further apart to show that while they both guide the image, they are not the same thing (Lohr, 203)

Yikes, my first attempts at this image were awful.  My viewer was overwhelmed and had no idea what to look at.  I struggled with making the title fit the image without overwhelming it, but after considering proximity I felt comfortable with making the size it currently is.  In addition, I made adjustments to how I was highlighting the swing states themselves, which now I believe is more consistent throughout the image.

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance: Lessons in visual literacy. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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